English Language Arts

Brian Moore

English Language Arts Lead Teacher

Mr. Brian Moore
mooreb@canandaiguaschools.org

The Canandaigua City School District English department seeks to develop students who are strategic readers, effective writers, engaging speakers, and critical thinkers.

The main goal of the English Language Arts program is to teach students English language literacy skills. These skills are primarily expressed in the ability to effectively read, write, listen and speak.

In addition to teaching literacy skills, the program also emphasizes the appreciation of literature. A wide variety of authors and genres are presented to students throughout the K-12 continuum. Students are taught content knowledge about significant literary eras and specific titles, as well as notable authors. Students are also taught figurative language and other literary devices that enhance and enrich the study of literature.

Furthermore, students in ELA classrooms across the grade-levels are encouraged to create their own texts in a meaningful and supportive manner so that their individual voices and perspectives might be brought to a wider audience.



Primary Elementary School
English/ELA/Writing/Reading

The Scott Foresman ELA program is used as a resource to teach early reading strategies. As a district, we are meeting the requirements of the Common Core Learning Standards through the implementation of New York State provided curriculum in grades K through 2 (Listening and Learning) and grades 3 through 5 (Modules).

spelling bee winners

Middle School
English/ELA/Writing/Reading

Grade 6

Grade 6 ELA Topics

Personal Narrative
Compare/Contrast
Persuasive/Research
Expository
Poetry
Editing
Grammar

6th English Language Arts is taught over 2 periods. These periods are taught back to back and will be 80 minutes each day. Students will work on improving their reading and writing skills.

The New York State Modules are the base of our instruction in reading and writing. There are four modules that will take approximately 10 weeks each- or one marking period per module- to teach. The instructional focuses explored in these modules are close reading, writing to learn, working with evidence, understanding perspectives, research, decision making, and forming positions. Within these instructional focuses, students will work on a variety of skills that align to the Common Core Learning Standards.

Grade 7

In Grade 7 ELA, students improve their reading, writing, listening and speaking through the use of fiction and non-fiction text.

Module 1: Close Readng and Writing to learn
Module 2: Working with Evidence
Module 3: Understanding Perspectives
Module 4: Research, Decision Making and Forming Positions

Grade 8

Grade 8 ELA Topics


-Poetry
-Short Stories/Edgar Allen Poe
-Shakespeare-Romeo and Juliet
-Gary Schmidt- Okay for Now
-Thanhha Lai- Inside Out and Back Again
-Independent Reading: book groups, projects, etc.

High School
English/ELA/Writing/Reading

High School ELA Courses

0004 ENGLISH 9R

0004 ENGLISH 9R

Full Year 1 unit Grade 9

English 9R is a Regents course designed to prepare students to take the Common Core Regents Exam during their junior year. The class reinforces reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Some examples of literature studied in this course include the following: Maus II, Antigone, Fahrenheit 451, and Taming of the Shrew.

0005 ENGLISH 9H

0005 ENGLISH 9H

Full Year 1 unit Grade 9

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, an 8th grade ELA assessment score of 3 or 4, and an 8th grade class average of 90 or above.

This is a Pre-AP/IB course

English 9 Honors will offer students interested in taking accelerated English classes the opportunity to begin an intensive study of American and British authors that will continue in English 10 Honors. Successful in English 9 Honors students are highly motivated and have demonstrated mastery of basic reading and writing skills as evidenced by strong scores in 8th grade English, on the grade-8 ELA, and on the 8th grade benchmark assessments. Students successful in 9 Honors will have the option of taking English 10 Honors—a class in which students eventually sit for the New York State Regents—during their sophomore year. Students then have the option of taking IB, AP, or elective classes during their junior and senior years.

0011 ENGLISH 10R

0011 ENGLISH 10R

Full Year 1 unit Grade 10

Prerequisite: English 9

English 10R is designed to prepare students for success on the Common Core Regents Examination in English during their junior year. This course will strengthen students’ reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through the study of short fiction, poetry, a research project and full length works like Of Mice and Men, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Macbeth and Medea.

0012 ENGLISH 10H

0012 ENGLISH 10H

Full Year 1 unit Grade 10

Prerequisite: English 9 teacher recommendation.

This is a Pre-AP/IB Course

English 10 Honors will allow students interested in taking accelerated English classes to complete the English 11 American Literature course in 10th grade. Students will sit for the Common Core English Regents Examination as their final exam. The curriculum will consist of the English 11 Regents program, plus some additional readings and assessments found in college-level courses. After completing this course, students will enter into one of the AP English classes, the elective program, or the IB program.

0022 ENGLISH 11R

0022 ENGLISH 11R

Full Year 1 unit Grade 11

Prerequisite: English 10

English 11R will allow students to continue to develop and apply their skills in reading and writing during a year-long study of American authors who reflect the rich diversity of our culture and heritage. Works studied will include The Great Gatsby, The Crucible, Death of a Salesman, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, among others. Students will sit for the Common Core Regents Examination in English in June.

0034 ENGLISH 12R

0034 ENGLISH 12R

Full Year 1 unit Grade 12

Prerequisite: English 11

This is a course designed to meet the needs of a mixed number of students who may be interested in pursuing a college education. Students will continue to develop the skills of close reading, analysis, writing, and communicating necessary in college and the workforce. Students will read poetry, essays, short fiction, and full length works, which may include The Catcher in the Rye, Johnny Got His Gun, The Things They Carried, and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, among others. Students will also complete a research project, deliver a speech, and write a variety of papers throughout the year.

0067 THE ARTHURIAN LEGENDS & ROMANCES

0067 THE ARTHURIAN LEGENDS & ROMANCES

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

Arthurian Legends and Romances will provide students with the chance to explore the development and progression of the legend of King Arthur and his knights of the round table. Students will study a variety of texts in chronological order to see how this legend has evolved over the years. After looking at the historical texts from which the legend of King Arthur began, students will read Sword in the Stone to establish Arthur’s upbringing, followed by Queen of Air and Darkness and the Ill-Made Knight to learn about the childhood environment of several knights, as well as the apply the impact of that environment to their adult decision-making process as members of the Round Table. Students will view films, such as Merlin, Lancelot, and Camelot to aid in knowledge of characterization, plot development, and themes. In addition students will read and analyze how stories such as Merlin, The Death of King Arthur, Parzival, Tristan, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, “Lanval,” and “Culhwch and Olwen” add onto the Arthurian Legend, noting the changes through time and culture.

0514 BUSINESS COMMUNIC. I 0515 BUSINESS COMMUNIC II

0514 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS I

0515 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS II

Full Year 1 unit Grade 12

Prerequisite: Business Communications I is required before students enter Bus. Comm. II

* Please note that this course is not an approved English course through the NCAA clearinghouse.

Students will develop communication skills that are crucial for success in the 21st-century workplace by engaging in scenario-based activities that focus on effective communication and presentation, cultural diversity in the workplace, foundations of professional written communication, and career planning, among other topics. Students will also read and analyze a variety of books, articles, and reports, all of which are chosen to build critical thinking and decision-making skills. Both Business Communications I and II are reading- and writing-intensive classes. This course can be used toward a 4th unit of English credit.

NOTE: Priority will be given to seniors interested in pursuing a career and/or college major within the Business field. Students who enroll in Business Communication I must also enroll in Business Communication II.

0065 CREATIVE WRITING

0065 CREATIVE WRITING

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

This course which is designed to meet the needs of students with an interest in and a talent for creative writing, will focus on instruction in creative non-fiction, the short story, and children’s literature. If there is time, a poetry unit will also be included. Flexible time for in-class writing will be provided. Students will complete portfolios that include pieces from the first three units.

0089 THE FILMS OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK

0089 THE FILMS OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

* Please note that this course is not an approved English course through the NCAA clearinghouse.

Beloved by audiences and critics alike, and well-known as “The Master of Suspense,” Alfred Hitchcock was one of the most skilled and influential filmmakers in history. This course will recognize Hitchcock’s thematic and aesthetic concerns as an auteur, and identify and evaluate his signature style, form, and narration. Students will read from a variety of critical and theoretical texts and assess Hitchcock’s innovative contributions to film and his enduring influence on other filmmakers.

NOTE: This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students will be required to read and write about every film we watch, and to read and respond to a great amount of film analysis and criticism. In addition, students will be expected to watch and analyze a substantial number of films from different time periods, which will challenge them to appreciate film outside their knowledge and experience.

0084 HARRY POTTER I 0085 HARRY POTTER II

0084 HARRY POTTER I

0085 HARRY POTTER II

Half Year ½ unit each Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Harry Potter I is required before students enter Harry Potter II

*Please note these courses are not approved English courses through the NCAA clearinghouse.

Harry Potter I and II are courses designed to examine the many facets of the magical world created by J.K. Rowling. As a foundational study, the courses will explore the role of mythology in the series. Although the novels lay the groundwork for the course, a study of the books from a literary standpoint will be only part of the overall course work. Students will be required to research, analyze, and create a variety of works in both oral and written assessments. Culminating assessments in HP I include creative assignments and a persuasive research presentation. Students will read the first four books of the series if taking HP I only.

HP II consists of reading the rest of the books of the series, including Tales of Beedle the Bard. As students study the books, they will be required to apply critical perspectives, such as Feminist, Psychological, Historical/Biographical, and Marxist approaches, to their reading. Students will learn about Jung’s psychological concepts of good and evil and explore how this contributes to the allure of these novels. As the books have proven both popular and controversial, students will examine censorship issues surrounding the Harry Potter books. We will also explore allegorical readings of the series. Culminating assessments in HP II include storytelling, the creation of a fictional Hogwarts student’s journal, and a final examination essay.

0080 IRISH LITERATURE

0080 IRISH LITERATURE

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

Irish Literature will take students on a tour through Ireland’s rich storytelling tradition. After looking closely at Irish mythology and traditional poetry, students will study the short stories and poems that have evolved from the country’s long struggle to maintain and celebrate its unique and colorful culture. Authors studied include James Joyce, W. B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, Lady Gregory, J. M. Synge, Oscar Wild, Maurice O’Sullivan, Peig Sayers, Roddy Doyle, Brendan Behan, and Frank McCourt.

0092 MEDIA MAKER

0092 MEDIA MAKER

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

* Please note that this course is not an approved English course through the NCAA clearinghouse.

In the 21st Century, so much of the media we read and watch happens on-line through social media such as Facebook or Twitter, web pages, blogs, story sharing sites like Medium, or video sharing like YouTube. Wouldn’t it be great to not only to study online media but also to participate and work on creating it for others?

In this course, students will do just that: Design content for the web. Students will learn aspects of digital writing, including blogging, website development, podcasting. They will research and write about topics of personal interest and then create media designed particularly for the web. Students will blog and share weekly writing in online environments. Along with personal blogs and websites, students will create larger multimedia projects such as video podcasts. By the end of the semester, students will explore ways to promote online writing and media to larger audiences.

0076 MONSTERS, GHOSTS, AND ALIENS

0076 MONSTERS, GHOSTS, AND ALIENS

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

* Please note that this course is not an approved English course through the NCAA clearinghouse.

Few genres lend themselves to such inspired inquiry and study as horror, supernatural, and science fiction. In addition to spurring our imaginations, all three genres have often served to reflect and critique the society we live in, and give shape and vision to our most compelling hopes, dreams, and fears. Moreover, as W. Scott Poole points out in the textbook we’ll be reading, monsters, ghosts, and aliens are “meaning machines” that allow us to understand American history more deeply. Films include: Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, King Kong, The Invasion of the Body Snatchers, I Married a Monster from Outer Space, The Haunting, Blade Runner, Empire Strikes Back, Aliens, Gattaca, Serenity, and The Sixth Sense.

0079 MYTHOLOGY & ALLUSION

0079 MYTHOLOGY & ALLUSION

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

Mythology and allusion will trace the journey of the classic hero and other mythic archetypes in ancient texts to which modern works of Western literature allude. Students will study selected works from Edith Hamilton’s Mythology and Joseph Campbell’s The Hero with a Thousand Faces, as well as readings from An Introduction to Biblical literature, specifically selections from Genesis, Exodus, and the Book of Job. The study of these ancient texts will focus on a literary analysis of mythic patterns in sacred stories. Students will then trace these archetypal patterns in Homer’s The Odyssey, George Lucas’s Star Wars, and Faulkner’s modern epic, As I Lay Dying.

0075 SHAKESPEARE COMEDY & ROMANCE

0075 SHAKESPEARE COMEDY & ROMANCE

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

This course is a study of Shakespeare’s comedies and tragi-comedies like Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, and The Winter’s Tale. We will read and view each of the plays to discuss characterization, humor, women’s roles, and theme. Students can expect to write papers, memorize lines, and discuss the plays in an open forum.

0081 SHORT STORY

0081 SHORT STORY

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

This course focuses on reading and studying the genre of classic short stories from around the world. Integrated into the course will be the analysis of the short story form, wherein a variety of critical approaches to reading literature will be explored. Students will compare these critical approaches, as well as the authors’ various literary styles. A comparative look at the cinema as it interprets selected short stories will also be explored. As a part of the course assessment, students will participate in group discussions as well as complete creative written and oral projects (short story talks, performances, short story pieces, and oral interpretation).

0077 SPEECH, DEBATE & THE ORAL TRADITION

0077 SPEECH, DEBATE & THE ORAL TRADITION

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

From “ I Have a Dream” to JFK’s Inaugural Address” – from informative speech topics such as The Loch Ness Monster to the History of Canandaigua - Students will learn how to write and deliver effective speeches, critique and analyze published speeches, and critique and analyze speeches of their peers. They will participate in a research-based debate and engage in story-telling and reader’s theater exercises. Students will also work through the job interview process and participate in a mock interview in which other students serve as an interview committee. We will frequently use improv as a method through which we develop our comfort in front of a group. Students can expect to write research-based speeches, deliver these speeches, write peer-review papers, create and develop characters by means of various exercises, and speak extemporaneously. Students will finish the semester with an impromptu speech; the skills involved in such are wide-reaching, setting students up for success in a variety of future fields, situations, and circumstances.

0091 SURVEY OF AMERICAN CULTURE

0091 SURVEY OF AMERICAN CULTURE

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

*Please note this course is not an approved English course through the NCAA clearinghouse.

From Snow White to Darth Vader, Duke Ellington to Jimi Hendrix, and Charlie Chaplin to Woody Allen, this course will offer a selective survey of 20th century American culture in film, television, music, and art. Focusing on significant cultural events and people from the 1920s through the 1970s, students will broaden their understanding of how our cultural past has reflected, critiqued, or molded our present notions of American identity and purpose.

A true humanities course, this course will be guided by the expertise of its primary English and film instructor, but also benefit from the knowledge and experience of Canandaigua Academy Social Studies, Music, and Art teachers, who will also have input on its content and teaching.

NOTE: This is reading and writing intensive course. Students will be required to read and write about every film we watch, and to read and respond to a wide variety of film analysis and criticism. In addition, students will be expected to watch and analyze a substantial number of films from different time periods, which will challenge them to appreciate film outside their knowledge and experience.

0090 UNDERSTANDING GRAPHIC NOVELS

0090 UNDERSTANDING GRAPHIC NOVELS

Half Year ½ unit Grades 11-12

* Please note that this course is not an approved English course through the NCAA clearinghouse.

More than just comic books, graphic novels are narrative works where the story is conveyed to the reader using sequential art. Throughout the course, students will study the graphic novel as literature, briefly investigating the history and evolution of sequential art, developing a vocabulary for evaluating and discussing the graphic novel as a narrative form, and closely analyzing representative works of personal and political memoir, social satire, and commercial escape. The goals of the course include: developing an understanding of the graphic novel as literature and art form, exploring the graphic novel as a means of gaining greater insights into human motivations and values, exploring the graphic novel as a means of gaining greater insights into human motivations and values, and developing skills in the analysis and written criticism of graphic fiction. Literature studied in this course includes, but is not limited to, the following: Persepolis, Maus I, Watchmen, and Kingdom Come.

0071 ENGLISH 101 (FLCC ENG101 – Composition I) 0072 ENGLISH 103 (FLCC ENG103 – Composition II)

0071 ENGLISH 101 (FLCC ENG101 – Composition I)

0072 ENGLISH 103 (FLCC ENG103 – Composition II)

Possible 3 college credits from FLCC per course

Cost: $15 per course

Half Year ½ unit each Grade 12

Prerequisites: 80% or higher on the Comprehensive Regents Examination and passing average on the 11th grade benchmarks. Students must have an 80% average in English 11 to qualify for English 101/103. In order to take 103 for Gemini credit, a student must have successfully completed 101.

Students will work to develop critical-reasoning skills, which they will apply in their readings, writings, and discussions. And, whether through Socratic seminars, in-class writings, or research, all students will be expected to participate actively. The primary focus in English 101 is learning to write in college-level and professional situations. Students will learn how to engage in a writing process that will produce college-level work. During this course, we will explore three writing situations: reflection, information, and problem solving. At the end of the semester, students will have written three major essays. As part of the course, students are expected to revise essays and to maintain a portfolio of their writing. Students who have completed AP Language and Composition are not eligible for English 101.

English 103 is a continuation of English 101. The class will explore four major writing situations: evaluation, analysis, argumentation and research. As in English 101, students must demonstrate their writing process through four major essays and a portfolio of their written work. Students who have completed AP Language and Composition and/or Literature and Composition are not eligible for English 103.

0024 AP LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION

0024 AP LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION

Possible 3 college credits

Cost: Approximately $91

Full Year 1 unit Grades 11-12

This course will prepare students to sit for the SAT subject test in Language and Composition. Students will learn to read nonfiction in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Students will also learn to write in a variety of modes and for a variety of purposes. This course will reflect the content of a typical college freshman composition course. In addition to a college reader, The Practical Stylist with Readings, students will study The Grapes of Wrath, Into the Wild, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, 1984, as well as selections from such greats as Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Abraham Lincoln, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Students will have the option of taking the AP Exam at the end of the year. Please note that this is a writing-intensive class. Students who receive a 3 or higher on the AP exam may possibly get six credits from FLCC (English 101 and a Humanities elective). As a result students who have completed AP Language and Composition are not eligible for English 101.

0033 AP LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

0033 AP LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

Possible 3 college credits

Cost: Approximately $91

Full Year 1 unit Grades 11-12

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is designed to provide capable and dedicated students a challenging study of literature, language, and composition. It is a writing-intensive course that will prepare students to sit for the AP Literature examination in May. Students will study a wide variety of literature, including Ella Minnow Pea (read over the summer), Oedipus Rex, Hamlet, Jane Eyre, Song of Solomon, Death of a Salesman, The Scarlet Letter, The Handmaid’s Tale, and The Bell Jar.

As a culminating assessment, students will prepare a 12-15 minute analytical speech on multiple works by an author they have independently chosen and studied throughout the year. Students who receive a 3 or higher on the AP test may be eligible for six Gemini credits for English 101 and 103 through FLCC. As a result, students who have completed AP Literature and Composition are not eligible for English 103.

0068 IB ENGLISH A1, HL

0068 IB ENGLISH A1, HL

Possible 6 college credits

Cost: IB Subject Fee

Two Full Years 1 unit per year Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: 80% or higher on Regents exam; successful completion of grade 11 portion of A1 is a prerequisite for grade 12 portion of A1.

This course is designed to provide capable and dedicated students a challenging study of literature, composition, and language. The literature selections aim to promote an appreciation of texts that present a global perspective, immersing students in diverse cultures. At the same time, these selections are tied together by presenting universal themes which students will discuss as they explore the methods and literary techniques authors use to convey meaning across cultures and throughout the ages within a comparative framework. Some or all of the following works may be studied over the course of two years: Crime and Punishment, Hamlet, Song of Solomon, and other shorter works. Reading list (probable):

Part 1(teacher will choose three of the following)

  • Stories of Franz Kafka
  • Accidental Death of an Anarchist by Dario Fo
  • Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky
  • The Assault by Mulisch
  • A Doll’s House by Ibsen
  • Cyrano de Bergerac by Rostand

Part 2 (teacher will choose three of the following)

  • Hamlet by Shakespeare
  • Poetry by Frost/Dickinson/Heaney
  • Merchant of Venice by Shakespeare
  • The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath (counts as nonfiction)

Part 3 (the teacher will choose 4 of the following)

  • Master Harold. . . and the Boys by Athol Fugard
  • A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
  • Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
  • Hamlet by Shakespeare
  • The Merchant of Venice by Shakespeare
  • Buried Child, Sam Shepard

Part 4

  • Poetry by Mary Oliver
  • The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  • Like Water for Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, With Recipes, Romances and Home Remedies by Laura Esquivel
  • Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
  • Into the Wild, John Krakauer

0086 IB FILM Year 1 SL/HL 0088 IB FILM Year 2 SL/HL

0086 IB FILM Year 1 SL/HL

0088 IB FILM Year 2 SL/HL

Possible 3 college credits

Cost: IB Subject Fee

Two Full Years 1 unit per year Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Students must complete IB Film Year 1 before entering into IB Film year 2. In order to receive English credit, students must have a passing score on the ELA regents.

*Please note these courses are not approved English courses through the NCAA clearinghouse.

IB credit will be given to students who take this course for the full two years. Students also have the option of taking the first year in place of an English elective. Open to all students seriously interested in film, this course is designed to develop in students the skills necessary to achieve a critical and creative knowledge and experience of film as a text, medium, and institution. Students will be challenged to demonstrate an understanding of film as a complex art form through film analysis, film theory and history, and film production. Students will study films from a variety of countries, genres, and time periods and gain experience in the practical and technical skills of production. Students will not only be expected to watch a wide variety of films, both in class and out, but also to write papers, scripts, and journals.

The chart below gives a brief outline of the primary differences in the assessments in HL and SL for the two years in IB film:


Assessment Component

SLHL
External Assessment

Independent Study

Documentary script on 2 films

Documentary script on 4 films

Oral presentation

10 minute oral analysis of film excerpt15-minute oral analysis of film excerpt

Internal Assessment

Film Production

Film 4-5 minutes
~
Written reflectin of 1,200 words
Film 6-7 minutes + trailer
~

Written commentary of 1,750 words

0040 THEATER ARTS AND DRAMA I 0041 THEATER ARTS AND DRAMA II

0040 THEATER ARTS AND DRAMA I

0041 THEATER ARTS AND DRAMA II

Full Year 1 unit Grades 10-12

*Please note these courses are not approved English courses through the NCAA clearinghouse

Drama students will read, analyze and interpret selected plays that represent major historical movements in theatre from the Greeks to the present. Selections include Sophocles’ Oedipus’s Rex, Everyman by anonymous, Shakespeare’s King Lear, Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest, Wilder’s Our Town and Sheppard’s True West. Students will research, write and present a speech about theatre history. Students will perform improvisations, music interpretations, character developments, monologues and small scenes. Students are required to participate in a class production at the end of the course and to spend ten out-of-class hours in stage production each semester.

The focus of Drama II will be to read and analyze Shakespearean histories and comedies, modern drama, and contemporary examples of theatre. Selections include Shakespeare’s Henry V, Much Ado About Nothing, and Twelfth Night; Ibsen’s Enemy of the People, Strindberg’s Ghost Sonata and Shaffer’s Equus. Students are required to direct (co-direct) a production in the spring and to spend ten hours out of class on stage productions each semester.